Christine Powers - Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage - Cohasset



Posted by Christine Powers on 12/29/2015

After numerous years of living in your home, you will soon become bored of the same decorations and furnishings, or at least stop appreciating them. This in turn can create a dull environment to live in, which is the last thing you want in your home. By following these tips in how to spruce up your house, you can ensure that your home always looks vibrant and welcoming. Sprucing up your home does not have to cost a lot of money, as you will find that there are many bargains available when it comes to finding decorative items. In fact, one way to get these bargains is by shopping online, as many reputable home decoration stores have great offers available. The first thing to keep in mind as you begin creating that new look in your home is that you should always work towards a theme. In fact, this is one of the most important tips in how to spruce up your house, because without the right type of theme, you will find that your decorations can look very noisy to the eye. The best way to begin sprucing up your home is by focusing on one room at a time, and as you finish that room, you can then gradually move onto the next room. By taking this approach, you will be able to focus on that theme, and you will also not feel overwhelmed in the process. Lastly, keep in mind that it is necessary to get the input of your family, because this will ensure that everyone is happy with the overall new look of your home.





Posted by Christine Powers on 12/8/2015

Homemade soft scrub cleaner is one of the quickest and easiest cleaners to make. It is so easy you won't be spending lots of money of expensive store bought cleaners anymore. Here is an easy recipe for scrubbing cleaner: Ingredients: 3/4 cup baking soda 1/4 cup borax dishwashing liquid 1. Combine the baking soda and borax. 2. Mix in enough dishwashing liquid to make a smooth paste. 3. If you prefer a pleasant smell, add 1/4 teaspoon lemon juice to the paste or a few drops of essential oil.  





Posted by Christine Powers on 10/20/2015

Many homes in our area have stories to tell. If you live in an older home, you may want to know its hidden secrets. You may have wondered who slept in your bedroom or when the home was actually built. Your home holds many clues to its history and its prior owners. With some detective work you will be well on your way to uncovering your home's hidden past. Here are some hints to get you started. Gather Information In order to get started you will need to uncover all of the information you have, you will want to gather your deed and title paperwork. Make note of the first owner, year built, and the year the original owner sold it. You will also want to know the names of all the owners, as well as the years they bought and sold the property. All of this information may not be available on your deed but you will be able to find it at town hall or the registry of deeds. You may find clues in the names of owners and years owned. Pay attention to details and look for clues. Some clues to the history of the home may be: a family that owned the home for a long time, multiple property turnovers and inconsistencies in property or land descriptions. Tackling the Records Wading through the mountains of information may be difficult but don't get discouraged. Information about your home’s owners will most likely be contradictory. Census records dating back to the year your house was built are likely available at your public library, a nearby university or your local historical society or museum. Review census rosters from the year closest to the one your house was built. Census records from the 1800s and early 1900s have lots of fun and interesting information and often include the names of all those living in a household at the time, their ages, occupations, places of birth, and sometimes more. You may also want to search for census data on the U.S. Census website. Getting Help Some of the language on deeds and title paperwork can be hard to understand put older language in the mix and it can be even more confusing. Ask friends who are lawyers, title-company employees or experts in historical documents for help. You can also turn to the internet for help. Use the internet to dig up any information you can find about the families who lived in your home, as well as the surrounding streets, neighborhoods, and landmarks. If prior owners of your home are relatives you can use genealogy web sites for research. Getting a Feel for the Times Read through newspapers from the year your house was built. You will start to get a sense of the historical times. Keep notes on everything you find that mentions your house and its occupants. In those times local papers covered social news of all kinds—dinner parties, haying trips, visits from out-of-town relatives—in addition to chronicling everything from world events to weather. They often covered construction of new homes, and may offer you information on where the builders got the materials used to build your house, why they made certain design decisions, and more. More Information For more information regarding researching homes you may want to try some of the books listed. American Shelter: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the American Home, by Lester Walker, Overlook Press, 1981 How Old is This House? by Hugh Howard, Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 1989 House Styles in America, by James C. Massey and Shirley Maxwell, Penguin Studio, 1996 Old American House, by Henry Lionel Williams and Ottalie K. Williams, Bonanza Books, 1957 A Field Guide to American Houses, by Virginia and Lee McAlester, Random House, 1984





Posted by Christine Powers on 10/6/2015

Just like kids, your pets need a safe home to live in. Just like a curious toddler pets can get into everything! So here are some tips to keeping your four-footed children safe in your home. The first thing you may want to do is get down on all fours and paw your way around your home looking for potential pet hazards. By taking the time to look at your home through your pet's eyes you will be able to more likely spot possible problem areas. -Take precautions with your plants.  Many common house plants are poisonous to pets when chewed or ingested. Check your plants and either eliminate toxic plants or move them to a safe area away from pets. -Lock your cabinets. Just like you would for a young child lock up medications, and keep household and lawn chemicals out of reach from pets. -Install toddler safety gates to keep animals in safe areas only. -Move the trashcan to a location that your pet cannot access. Food wrappers and some foods like grapes and raisins are harmful for pets. Put your trash in a locked cabinet if possible. -Look for strangulation hazards. Curtains and blind cords should be tied up and kept out of your pet’s reach. -Tuck away and hide wires and cords that are often temptation for pets who like to chew. -If you want to be extra-cautious, consider keeping your pets in a crate when you have to leave the house.




Tags: pet proof   pet safety  
Categories: Help Around the House  


Posted by Christine Powers on 9/29/2015

You can do just about anything with an app. Like the saying goes; "there's an app for that". If you are a homeowner there are several apps you will want to download to your mobile device. Here are just a few to get you started: Houzz -Design your perfect room with Houzz. Homeowners can create an idea book for their next remodeling project by searching rooms and photos.  The items in the photos have tags with pricing and availability, members can also tag items they have seen in stores and provide additional info. Houzz integrates with Facebook, Flicker, and Twitter to share ideas with friends. ColorSmart by BEHR – See what your room will look like with new paint without even picking up a paintbrush. ColorSmart allows you to take a picture of the room, choose your paint, and then preview what the room would look like in different colors. Photo Measures – No need to figure out if the furniture will fit, with this app, you simply upload a photo of a room, and then write in all its measurements so you never have to remember the exact layout. Now you will always be able to make sure that everything will fit perfectly. Mint.com-Budget your money and control all of your finances on your iPhone. Mint.com will gathers all bank, credit card, and loan statements in one place, letting users see where every penny goes. The app also makes money saving recommendations based on spending habits HomeSavvy – Never forget to do a home maintenance project again. This app gives you a customized home maintenance schedule and alerts you when it’s time to get the project done. It also includes a directory of local businesses with customer ratings for each task that needs completed. What are some of your favorite apps to help you around the house?  







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